Posts Tagged ‘Dallas Morning News’

Dallas, ‘The State’ move to paid online

Monday, August 30th, 2010

Update: Dallas Morning News CEO Jim Moroney says the News & Tech report is “not accurate.”

Two major metropolitan dailies plan to put part of their online coverage behind pay walls, according to News & Technology.

The Dallas Morning News, the A.H. Belo Corp. flagship, in the next six months will wall off staff-written stories as well as content about the Dallas Cowboys. Wire service reports and breaking news stories with fewer than 150 words would be free, and seven-day-a-week print subscribers will continue to get it all without additional charges.

The Providence (R.I.) Journal, another Belo property, is also looking at limiting the amount of website content available to nonsubscribers, N&T said.

The N&T report did not say how much the Dallas paper would charge for website access.

McClatchy’s The State of Columbia, S.C., is making its GoGameCocks.com site require a  membership costing $50 a year or $10 a month. Fans of University of South Carolina sports who agree to pay the $50 fee will receive one week for free, during which time they can opt out if they aren’t satisfied. Print subscribers get access for free.

How newspapers are – and aren’t – diversifying

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010

Media critic Alan Mutter uses a McClatchy newspaper as the negative example in a post on his Newsosaur blog about how large newspaper publishers are diversifying to survive in the new media world.

“While papers like the Kansas City Star continue to pursue the traditional model of publishing only the main title and a free once-a-week advertising product sent to the homes of non-subscribers, the ABC [Audit Bureau of Circulations] reports that papers like the Chicago Tribune and Dallas Morning News have created such a wide variety of products that the flagship paper produces just 56 percent of the average weekday circulation in each of their respective markets,” Mutter writes.

As circulations fall, “foresighted publishers are creating niche products to try to capture readers who historically were unlikely to buy the legacy newspaper – and, of course, the advertisers who covet them as customers,” he adds.

The Tribune and Morning News both publish periodicals aimed at young adults and those who prefer to read Spanish-language publications. The Tribune also publishes a free tabloid written by and for teenagers, and the Morning News delivers a free, weekly TMC, or total-market-coverage, advertising product, like many McClatchy papers produce.

Mutter predicts that the once flagship, general interest newspaper will eventually become simply one product among several niche publications that successful publishers produce.

Better papers tap readers to build revenue

Friday, August 6th, 2010

Newsonomics author Ken Doctor finds that newspaper companies are turning to higher prices for the paper itself to battle revenue declines, rendering the traditional 80/20 ad-circulation split obsolete. And  the ones that are doing it well are getting away with charging readers more because they’ve made their papers better, he says.

“While the digital news world seems consumed with conversations about paywalls and memberships, it is old-fashioned print circulation revenue that is the gainer in the post-80/20 formulas,” Doctor writes for Nieman Journalism Lab. “Sure, advertising’s ski slope decline has greatly altered the 80/20. So has, though, the significant up-pricing of both subscriptions and single copies over the past three years.”

A leader in the trend is apparently The Dallas Morning News, which raised the price of monthly subscriptions from $18 to $30 and is earning 38 percent of its revenue from circulation, 54 percent from advertising, and 8 percent from “contract printing plus,” he says.

The Dallas paper’s parent, A.H. Belo, reported a 6.6 percent increase in circulation revenue in the second quarter, while The New York Times Company reported a 3.2 percent increase and Scripps had a 4.5 percent increase in the first quarter (Scripps’ 2Q report is due Monday).

“Significantly, I think, each of those companies may have done a better job of minimizing newsroom cuts and reinvesting — at least a little — in that now higher-priced product,” Doctor says.

Better than whom? Better than McClatchy, which reported a 2.5 percent circulation revenue decline in the second quarter (and has raised prices); Lee, which was down 4.4 percent; and Gatehouse, which was down 2.5 percent.

Doctor has the current splits for each of the four publishers, and for McClatchy, the one we follow, it’s pretty much the newly declared old-hat model of 20 percent circulation, 76 percent ads and 4 percent other.

Dallas paper’s new supervisors not in charge

Monday, December 7th, 2009

James Moroney III, publisher of the Dallas Morning News, has written another memo to  his staff explaining last week’s announcement that some editors will report to advertising sales managers who are now called “general managers,” Editor & Publisher says.

The new structure does not change the newsroom’s control of content, Moroney says.

E&P reports this morning: “Let’s be clear: In this company, the editors make the final decisions about all content we publish, up and until a dispute were to reach my office via the company’s highest-ranking editor, Bob Mong,” Moroney wrote in the memo delivered late Friday to staffers. “That’s the way it’s always been. That’s the way it is, and will be. The new organizational structure does not change this fact. We believe the new structure will help us launch new products that serve readers and advertisers better. But as we decide upon editorial content, we will always put our readers first.”

E&P has the full 751-word memo – at least the third attempt by the News’ management to explain the move – at the first link above.